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Off the sub, to safety

Ship & Boat International eNews: November/December 2020

jfdWEB

 

Underwater defence and dive specialist JFD has delivered a full-scale mock-up of a submarine rescue vehicle (SRV) to the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) for factory acceptance testing and harbour acceptance trials. The final version of the SRV, due in 2021, will be installed aboard ROKN’s forthcoming auxiliary submarine rescue ship (ASR-II), currently under construction at Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME). This 5,200tonne vessel will be commissioned by ROKN by the end of 2022.

 

The SRV will be deployed via the ASR-II’s midships moonpool, and will be capable of descending to 500m and operating in 4m waves. The 10.6m x 3.2m vehicle can carry up to 17 rescuees.

 

A spokesperson for JFD tells Ship & Boat International: “The vehicle has been built in high-yield quenched and tempered carbon steel, exceeding the strength of many military submarines, with precision-machined super duplex forgings for complex-shaped / corrosion-susceptible areas, to offer a great balance between low weight and through-life reliability." The SRV’s propulsive arrangement includes two main electric thrusters, enabling a speed of more than 3knots. Meanwhile, four auxiliary electric thrusters permit accurate low-speed manoeuvrability when mating with a distressed submarine.

 

A part of the SRV’s harbour acceptance trials will include an analysis of how it interacts with the ASR-II’s launch and recovery system (LARS). JFD adds: “The SRV and moonpool cradle are both tracked in 3D via an array of transponders, located on fixed points on the SRV and cradle.  Safe SRV mating to the moonpool cradle is primarily achieved by the SRV being sent live relative position data of itself and the cradle – the SRV processes this data in real time to build a 3D model of itself and the moonpool cradle, which allows the SRV pilots to know their exact position, regardless of visibility.” The SRV will also be fitted with high-resolution colour and low-light black and white cameras.

 

Danny Gray, JFD managing director, adds: “Following the delivery of the SRV next year, we will continue to work with ROKN and its partners in providing a comprehensive training and support programme that will ensure that the submarine rescue operations are carried out safely and efficiently.” JFD had delivered an earlier SRV design to ROKN in 2008.