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Historic Ships Online Conference 2020


2-3 December 2020

 

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The successful Historic Ships conference returns for a seventh instalment. Here at RINA we are not only proud of the current achievements in the marine industry, but also our maritime heritage. The history of the world is the history of the sea, that through trade and war shaped our modern world.

This conference will not only focus on the restoration and preservation of historic vessels, but also the research and investigation into the engineering and efficiency of historic designs through modern naval architecture techniques. With this event we will help to keep record of the skills and techniques used to construct and operate our historic ships for current and future generations.


Topics

Papers are invited from naval architects, academics, and enthusiasts on all related topics, including but not limited to:

• Analysis of historic designs, including investigations into their hydrodynamic efficiency and structural design

• Research into historic shipbuilding and sailing techniques

• Restoration and preservation

• Maintenance of craft skills and training

• Replicas and their concession to the modern world

• Recent archaeological discoveries

Selected papers may be published in the Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects


Conference Programme

Day 1 11:00 - 14:45

11:00 - 11:05 Welcome

11:05 - 11:40 A MYSTERY OF THE FIRST ICEBREAKER

D. Ponkratov, J. Pérez-Martínez, Royal Institution of Naval Architects, UK

11:40 - 12:15 GALATEA II: REBORN OF A CLASSIC

M. Castro Ruiz,  R. Perez Fernandez, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain

12:15 - 12:50 THE ROYAL LOUIS (1668), A SAILING MASTERPIECE

C. Tacchella, University of Genoa, Italy

12:50-13:35 Break

13:35 - 14:10 THE ENTRAILS OF A SHIP: A NAUTICAL POST-MORTEM

D. A. Walker, Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Canada

14:10 - 14:45 STEM FOR ALL ON THE SS FRESHSPRING: VR TOUR

H. K. Yaqub, L. Star, BMT, UK

M. Kemp, J. Puddy, SS Freshspring Trust, UK

 

Day 2 11:00 - 14:30

11:00 - 11:05 Welcome

11:05 - 11:40  THE ALBUM DE COLBERT: THE IMAGE OF SHIPBUILDING

M. Corradi, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italy

11:40 - 12:15 STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT AND SCANTLINGS OF TRADITIONAL SMALL CRAFTS

J.-B. R. G. Souppez, Aston University, UK

12:15 - 13:15 Break

13:15 - 13:50 TIMBER CONSTRUCTION: AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE STRENGTH OF SCARF JOINTS AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VARIOUS ADHESIVES FOR LAMINATED WOOD

J.-B. R. G. Souppez, Aston University, UK

13:50 - 14:30 Discussion

 

**UK time

**Presentation time includes Q&A of approximately 10 minutes

**The conference programme may be subject to change


Register Interest 

Click here to register your interest in the Historic Ships conference and receive updates as they become available.

If you have any questions please contact our conference organiser: conference@rina.org.uk

Conference fees

Members: £50+VAT=£60

Non-Members: £60+VAT=£72

Please click here to pay online

Please click here to pay via invoice

We offer sponsored conference places for Student Members and Associate Members in full time education. For more information or to request a place, contact Nick Cox at 


Call for Papers

To download the Call for Papers

Abstracts may be submitted at Call for Papers


Conference Venue

The Historic Ships conference will be held  online using Zoom. https://zoom.us/

It is not necessary to have a Zoom account to attend the Meetings, but those attending will be asked to download the Zoom App if not already downloaded. If you are unable to download, install, or run applications you may join from your browser. However, the meeting experience from the browser is limited.


Abstracts

A MYSTERY OF THE FIRST ICEBREAKER

D. Ponkratov, J. Pérez-Martínez, Royal Institution of Naval Architects, UK

SUMMARY

Almost a detective story describing a hopeless search in archives which took many years and apparently resulted in the discovery of not just the singular origin of the first ice breaker, but the engineering ingenuity that led to that first design. This paper will uncover the forgotten history of the first icebreaker and will recreate its original shape using the original general arrangements and references uncovered during the research.

 

GALATEA II: REBORN OF A CLASSIC

M. Castro Ruiz, R. Perez Fernandez, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain

The history of the Galatea dates back to the 19th century when in 1896 she was launched and Christianised as Glenlee at Glasgow. She sailed as a merchant ship in the United Kingdom and Italy during the first period of her operational life, and was later adapted with mechanical propulsion.

After several circumnavigations, in 1922 she was renamed Galatea to serve in the Spanish Navy, where she remained in service for 60 years. Since 1993 she has been resting in her hometown in Scotland as a museum ship.

As a tribute to the extensive and remarkable history of this ship, and in order to recover and preserve the naval tradition in Spain, it has been proposed to design a ship with the same morphology as the Glenlee to stoke the spirit of the Galatea and inspire the construction of new sailing ships. She will be adapted as a military training ship of the Spanish Navy. Therefore, studies in stability, propulsion, general arrangement and structural calculations will be necessary to validate the transformation of the Glenlee into a new Galatea II complying with mandatory regulations and technological advances that will encourage its operation to the future naval officers of the Spanish Navy.

 

THE ROYAL LOUIS (1668), A SAILING MASTERPIECE

C. Tacchella, University of Genoa, Italy

SUMMARY

The French Navy’s finest hour began in the seventeenth century, when Colbert became the Prime Minister and decided to improve the national shipyards. Despite poor starting conditions, the results of Colbert’s efforts led France to be one of the major players in the struggle for naval power. In that moment, the European shipbuilding had a changing in construction techniques mostly in warships. In France, this changing also involved vessels aesthetics. Indeed, shipwrights’ tasks were not only to build ships with great naval skills, but vessels had also to be aesthetically striking and eye-catching in order to show at the world the Roy Soleil’s power and wealth. Many vessels were built in that style and the Royal Louis was one of the largest vessels built in 1668 at the Toulon. With particular attention to the Royal Louis, the essay aims to analyze several aspects of the world surrounding those floating masterpieces.

 

THE ENTRAILS OF A SHIP: A NAUTICAL POST-MORTEM

D. A. Walker, Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Canada

SUMMARY

The largest man-made explosion prior to the nuclear bomb occurred during World War I in Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada when a ship loaded with war munitions collided with another ship and detonated almost spontaneously. The author examines the retrieved shrapnel from the completely disintegrated ship to find clues to the extent and the effects of the explosion, and the distribution of the detritus. Many inquiries, studies and books have concentrated on the effects of this explosion on the shattered city, the population, buildings, emergency preparations, &c., but until now none have looked exhaustively at the ship, the floating bomb and its dispersed detritus.

 

STEM FOR ALL ON THE SS FRESHSPRING: VR TOUR H. K. Yaqub, L. Star, BMT, UK

M. Kemp, J. Puddy, SS Freshspring Trust, UK

SUMMARY

Over the past year the world has changed dramatically. With greater restrictions on accessibility, the need to provide innovative and distributable remote experiences is now more prominent than ever. BMT has partnered with the SS Freshspring Trust to create multi-generational STEM experiences. “Preserving the past to inspire knowledge for the future”. The SS Freshspring Trust have a vision to become a STEM hub by utilising cutting-edge technology. BMT have extensive experience in developing VR applications in the Maritime Domain. With skills shortfalls in many engineering disciplines, there is a need to inspire future generations into careers in STEM. Equally, many adults have a passion for technology and have valuable skills to offer to STEM projects. This paper uses the historic vessel SS Freshspring, a 1940s RFA Fresh Water Carrier currently being restored in North Devon, as the basis for exploring a range of initiatives and activities aimed at making engineering and technology interesting and accessible to all. The specific focus is on the development of an interactive 3D virtual tour, aiming to provide access to a wide audience by targeting a range of modalities including smartphones, internet browsers, and most consumer VR headsets.

 

THE ALBUM DE COLBERT: THE IMAGE OF SHIPBUILDING

M. Corradi, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italy

SUMMARY

The Album de Colbert compiled by an anonymous author in the second half of the seventeenth century is among the most important illustrated testimonies of the art of shipbuilding. Probably commissioned by Jean-Baptiste Colbert, Minister of Finance of the Kingdom of France, it was compiled with the aim of making Louis XIV understand the complexity of shipbuilding. The Album was made to support the creation of a navy with the ambition of being competitive with the Royal Navy and with the intent of modernizing and expanding the French shipbuilding industry. The fifty plates that make up this illustrated treatise unravel the story of the construction of a first-rank 80-gun line vessel, from the laying of the keel to the launch. It is a unique document that has no contemporaries or precursors because it is not a didactic collection of boats, like the previous treaties that had a completely different methodological approach, more technical-descriptive than illustrative, but wants to go beyond the scientific treatise. Its purpose is instead to measure itself with representation, showing through the strength of drawing and images the peculiar aspects of the reality of shipbuilding, using iconography as a means of transmitting knowledge related to the world of shipyards and shipbuilding in the 17th century.

 

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT AND SCANTLINGS OF TRADITIONAL SMALL CRAFTS

J.-B. R. G. Souppez, Aston University, UK

SUMMARY

The scantlings of traditional wooden crafts often originate from the extensive experience of designers and boatbuilders. With the contemporary regain of interest for historical replicas and timber construction, and the ever-critical necessity to minimise displacement, a compromise between the original scantlings and modern structural assessment must be struck. The latter heavily relies on rules-based design, driven by formal regulations, though a number of empirical methods also exist. Consequently, to assess the comparative structural requirements between traditional small crafts, empirical methods and regulatory requirements, case studies will be undertaken on small crafts. Ultimately, the results showcase the differences between original specifications, the recommendation of simplified methods, and modern rules, with the latter allowing for weight savings.

 

TIMBER CONSTRUCTION: AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE STRENGTH OF SCARF JOINTS AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VARIOUS ADHESIVES FOR LAMINATED WOOD

J.-B. R. G. Souppez, Aston University, UK

SUMMARY

Timber construction has recently seen a significant regain of interest across a range of industries, owing to contemporary concerns for sustainability. In the marine industry, historic principles of traditional wooden boatbuilding remain present, with empirical rules still common practice, as is the case for scarf joints. Moreover, laminated wood is made more attractive and efficient thanks to modern adhesives. However, with the progresses made in structural analysis, these assemblies can now be refined based on scientifically informed evidence. Consequently, this paper will employ destructive testing to tackle two distinct cases. On the one hand, the strength of feathered (plain) scarf joints as a function of their slope will be evaluated. On the other hand, the effectiveness of a range of adhesives will be ascertained for the purpose of laminated manufacturing. Ultimately, the results will be compared to both the strength of solid wood and the mechanical properties assumed by modern scantling regulations, revealing significant differences. The research findings provide a better understanding of these fundamental timber construction principles, supporting designers and builders alike in making informed choices and promoting safer regulatory compliance. It is also anticipated these findings will impact structural design beyond the wooden boatbuilding field, with applications in sustainable buildings and architecture.


Sponsorship & Exhibitors

RINA events provide the perfect opportunity for effective and highly targeted marketing. 

Sponsorship and exhibition opportunities exist for all of our conferences. For more information please follow the link or contact JP Media Services Tel: +44(0)1737 852 135 or e-mail:  to discuss tailored options or availability.


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